Welcome to Luther Memorial Chapel & University Student Center

 

We invite you to receive God's gifts with us!

 

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Divine Service

Sundays - 9:00a
Mondays - 7:00p

  

Bible Study &
Sunday School

Sundays - 10:30a
 

Matins

Wednesdays - 8:30a

 

 
ISM Scholarship *APPLY NOW!*

The International Student Ministry (ISM) of Luther Memorial Chapel and University Student Center at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee is offering a scholarship opportunity:

Two (2) $300 scholarships will be made available to LCMS undergraduate students attending UW-Milwaukee, Concordia University Wisconsin OR other Milwaukee area college or university in the fall of 2015.  The purpose of this scholarship is to provide an opportunity to learn about and volunteer in Christian outreach efforts to those from other lands (see ISM Scholarship application for more details).

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THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 27, 2015

THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 27, 2015
TEXT: LUKE 6:36-42; ROMANS 12:14-21; GENESIS 50:15-21
JUDGMENT AND MERCY ARE YOURS IN CHRIST
Keaton Christiansen


In the name of the Father, and of the + Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.


The words of our gospel lesson today are part of a larger sermon Jesus preaches that we call: “The Sermon on the Plain.”  In this sermon He preaches the second table of the Law, that is: the fourth through tenth commandments, which he summarizes as “Love your neighbor as yourself.” It is in this context, to the disciples who believe in Him, that Jesus gives the command: “37 Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven;”


At face value, this seems to run counter to what we know about the gospel: is Jesus saying that our forgiving is what gets us forgiveness from God? Of course not. The second table of the Law concerns how to treat our fellow human beings, how to love our neighbors as ourselves, and how in turn they might treat us back. It doesn't say “If … Then,” it just says “and.” Give to others, and they're more likely to give back to you. Don't condemn people, and they're much more likely not to condemn you back. This explains what Jesus said not ten verses earlier: “31 As you wish that others would do to you, do so to them.”


But in this fallen world, the passage, “37a Judge not, and you will not be judged” is frequently taken out of its context to mean something entirely different. You've probably heard versions of it here and there, a militant “tolerance” which tolerates no dissent. We live in a world where people try to self-identify as whatever gender, race, or condition, pleases them at the moment. We live in fallen human flesh, that constantly seeks to justify its own perverted urges. Any appeal to God's Law, or even to the basic facts of biology evokes clamors like this: “don't judge me,” “stop judging,” or eventually a smug appeal to the words of Jesus taken out of context: “Judge not, and you will not be judged.”


Dear Christian friends you need not be troubled by this misuse of the Lord's Name and of His Word. You are not to render judgment on others, because you are not the Judge. But, there is a judge, and He has not canceled any Law. Jesus says (Mt 5:17-18): “17 Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18 For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.”

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THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 21, 2015

THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 21, 2015
TEXT: LUKE 15:1-10; 1 TIM. 1:12-17; MICAH 7:18-20
IN COMPASSION THE SHEPHERD SEARCHES FOR ONE!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting


Grace, mercy, and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord. Dear hearers of the Word made flesh:


Scripture frequently exhorts us to think about others and put them first.  The Holy Spirit caused St. Paul to express it this way to the Philippians, “In humility count others more significant than yourselves… Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”  (Philippians 2:3-4).  Scripture exhorts us to be kind and tenderhearted forgiving one another – to love our neighbor as ourselves - to sacrificially serve those around us like Christ served the church.  Sin that distorts our life and our love for others surely includes our intense focus on self.


For the length of this sermon, however, I invite you not to think first about others.  As you listen please concentrate first on just one - yourself - your past - your present - your hopes for the future - your struggles – your fears - your state of mind!  You are unique! You have never been at this point in your life before!  For the moment – focus on just one - on you! 


That’s what Jesus did when the Pharisees grumbled, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.”   In their ongoing battle with Jesus, they thought He was wrong in seeking out those whose lives were a mess - hollowed out by bad choices - not respected by others – weak and in need.  They thought Jesus’ business was with decent folk like them.  Our Lord responds with beautiful words about oneone lost sheep, one lost coin, one lost son.  

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FIRST SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 7, 2015

CONFIRMATION DAY
TEXT: LUKE 16:19-31/1 JOHN 4:16-21/GENESIS 15:1-6
POVERTY AND RICHES BEFORE GOD:
THE GREAT REVERSAL IS GIVEN IN CHRIST!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting


Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.  Dear Laura, and Oliver and Elijah and Magda and Eva and Alexis and Rachel on the day of your confirmation – dear hearers of the Word made flesh;


Suffering in this groaning world is real!  It is often deep!  It may linger on and on!   At his gate was laid a poor man named Lazarus covered with sores, who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man’s table.  His poverty had endured so long that it defined him – a poor man.  His poverty was so deep that he hungered for scraps of food – what fell from the rich man’s table.  His bodily weakness was so profound – he had to be carried and set in place by others.  At his gate was laid…Lazarus.  His bodily sickness was not localized – he was covered with sores.  Suffering in this life is real!  It is often deep and lingering!  It may leave us with no strength and no hope for change.


How long, O Lord, will you forget me forever?  How long will you hide your face from me?  How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day?  Lazarus suffered!  As you hear of his misery and of the rich man’s disregard for him - you are right to cry out “no!”  Lazarus and those who loved him – those who laid him at the gate everyday – would have rightfully wept to God and properly prayed to Him the psalm of lament in our Introit - How long, O Lord, will you forget me forever? 

Like so much in our dying world, this is not right!  The full bodily weakness of Lazarus and sores covering his body – call to mind cells that mutate as cancer in our bodies and organs that wear out and vision that blurs and blood vessels that harden and muscles that weaken and bones that break and minds that falter - and all by divine decree.  We know that suffering is not to be equated with God’s punishment, but how do we reconcile the apparent contradiction of profound suffering with the love that God has for us?  In our culture of individual choice and the assumed right to be happy and an increasing secularized view of death, this objection will be increasingly important for Christians to address.  In the face of such realities can it be true that God is love?




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THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 14, 2015

THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 14, 2015
LUKE 14:15-24; EPHESIANS 2:13-22; PROVERBS 9:1-10
COME, FOR EVERYTHING IS NOW READY!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting


To the saints who are at Luther Memorial Chapel and University student center, and are faithful in Christ Jesus: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.


Come for everything is now ready!  On His way to Jerusalem Jesus tells of a banquet.  One of those who reclined at table with Him had heard him speak of who to invite if you gave a feast.  Jesus said not to invite your friends or the rich who could repay you but rather the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind.  He ended – For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the Just.  The man who heard these things then said – “Blessed is everyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!” 


Centuries earlier the prophet Isaiah had described a banquet on God’s holy mountain (Isaiah 25:6-9) – of rich food and well-aged wine for “all peoples.”  God would swallow up death forever – the veil that is spread over all nations.  The Jews, however (The Book of Enoch – The Messianic Rule – The Targum) largely rejected Isaiah’s vision of God’s end-time inclusive banquet.  They taught that no Gentiles would be present - nor anyone lame or blind or crippled. (Bailey – Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes – p.311ff.)  Their view of the end-time banquet disagreed with Jesus’ teaching about God’s gracious invitation.  Jesus here rebukes that view and states God’s holy will in the matter. 


 

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FUNERAL SERMON FOR SELMA BYHARDT – 5/27/2015

TEXT: JOHN 10:14, 17, 27-30
IN CHRIST JESUS, GOD HOLDS SELMA IN HIS HAND!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting

 

Dear Roger and Marilyn, Alan and Marie, Diane and Tom, David and Penny, dear grandchildren and other family members and friends of Selma Byhardt. As you mark the death of you mother, your grandmother, your friend, your sister in Christ, please give ear to the words of Jesus in John chapter 10, My sheep hear my voice, and I know them and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand.


These words of Jesus’ were the text for the last brief sermon I spoke to Selma at Horizon hospice care at St. Mary’s Mequon. Her breathing was heavy and aided by oxygen. Her coughing was persistent and difficult to see. When asked about receiving the Sacrament of the Altar her answer was a clearly expressed “yes”. During that service she clearly expressed her “yes” to the confession of sins – and she heard again the forgiving words of absolution that the risen Christ commanded be spoken to repentant sinners. In her room, she received again the heavenly food of her Savior’s true body and true blood for the forgiveness of her sins. It was an undeserved duty and delight to serve her the gifts of her Lord – on Thursday last and so many, many times in her home.


It is through His gifts in Christ that God holds us in His hand. His holding of 3 pound baby Selma began immediately after her birth. As her physical health and life was uncertain, God’s gift of holy baptism was administered to her right away. Life for a tiny infant back then was without the intensive care units of today. Baby Selma – so small as to held in one’s hand! Her life as a little girl was again threatened by a severe case of pneumonia. “If she makes it through the night she may live” – said the doctor. And she did back then. The report from Horizon hospice on Saturday would have been that 93 year old Selma did not make it through the night. And yet dear Christians – she did – for Christ has conquered death and in Christ Jesus, God holds Selma in His hand.

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Worship with Us!

Divine Service
Sundays @ 9:00am
Mondays @ 7:00pm

Bible Study
& Sunday School
Sundays @ 10:30am
 
Morning Prayer (Matins)
Wednesdays @ 8:30am