Welcome to Luther Memorial Chapel & University Student Center

 

We invite you to receive God's gifts with us!

 

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Divine Service

Sundays - 9:00a
Mondays - 7:00p

  

Bible Study &
Sunday School

Sundays - 10:30a
 

Matins

Wednesdays - 8:30a

 

 
ISM Scholarship *APPLY NOW!*

The International Student Ministry (ISM) of Luther Memorial Chapel and University Student Center at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee is offering a scholarship opportunity:

Two (2) $300 scholarships will be made available to LCMS undergraduate students attending UW-Milwaukee, Concordia University Wisconsin OR other Milwaukee area college or university in the fall of 2015.  The purpose of this scholarship is to provide an opportunity to learn about and volunteer in Christian outreach efforts to those from other lands (see ISM Scholarship application for more details).

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6th SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY,

SERMON FOR THE SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY, 7-12-2015
Rev. Dr. Brian German

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ, Amen.

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.”


John 3:16 may continue to pop up on poster boards at sporting events as “the Gospel in a nutshell,” but this verse from Matthew is the entire Bible in a nutshell. The person and work of Jesus cannot be understood apart from the “Law and the Prophets”—or the Old Testament—and the Old Testament cannot be understood apart from Him. Nothing is to be abolished; everything is to be fulfilled.

And yet this word “fulfill” seems to be a bit of a moving target. On the one hand, our Lord follows every dotted “I” and crossed “t” of the Old Testament. When He healed a leper, for example, He told the leper to follow the instructions that Moses wrote for cleansed lepers. When our Lord was confronted by a lawyer, He told him to review the Ten Commandments, the same ones we heard a few moments ago.

On the other hand, our Lord didn’t think twice about healing several people on the Sabbath—something that was clearly forbidden in the Old Testament. He also prohibited taking oaths—something that was clearly allowed in the Old Testament—and on numerous occasions he crossed the lines of fellowship. Today we even hear of an authority over the sacred past—“you’ve heard it said, but I say to you.”

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5TH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY, 7-5-2015

5TH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY, 7-5-2015
Works of Man vs. Works of God
Vicar Brad Akey


Grace, Mercy, and Peace be to you from God our Father and our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.


Have you ever thought about trying to go through life on your own? To not have a support system, to not be surrounded by people you trust, to have to do everything on your own? We can’t. We are not able to function on our own; we need to depend upon others to survive. If everything is left up to us and to our own ability, we will surely fail. This fact is often forgotten or at least taken for granted. Can a baby survive on its own? No, of course not, that is why God instituted the vocation of parents.


We all are dependent creatures, we need each other. But not only are we dependent upon each other, most of all we are dependent upon God.  Jesus said, “I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.” (John 15:5) When we try to rely upon human means we come up short, but God would have us trust in His care and His ability to provide for us, which may not always be in the manner or time frame in which we want it.


Trusting in one’s self brings about nothing, but trusting in God’s grace is receiving the fruits of forgiveness and life eternal.

Before this miraculous catch of fish and the calling of the first disciples, Jesus defeats Satan’s temptations. He was beginning to become widely known for all of His healing and cleansing from demons. He had said “I must preach the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns as well; for I was sent for this purpose.” After Jesus acknowledges this, He called His first disciples.


Then follows what we just heard: “On one occasion, while the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of God, he was standing by the lake of Gennesaret, and he saw two boats by the lake, but the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, which was Simon’s he asked him to put out a little from the land. And he sat down and taught the people from the boat.”

It must have been a fantastic sight to see these people come from all around, because they craved the Word of God so much. But isn’t that what you are doing? You are meeting in a place where Christ promises to be in the Word and Sacraments. You are hearing His Word and we will be feasting upon His body and His blood here in a few minutes. Christ is present among us, even if we cannot see him visibly.

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THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 21, 2015

THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 21, 2015
TEXT: LUKE 15:1-10; 1 TIM. 1:12-17; MICAH 7:18-20
IN COMPASSION THE SHEPHERD SEARCHES FOR ONE!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting


Grace, mercy, and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord. Dear hearers of the Word made flesh:


Scripture frequently exhorts us to think about others and put them first.  The Holy Spirit caused St. Paul to express it this way to the Philippians, “In humility count others more significant than yourselves… Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”  (Philippians 2:3-4).  Scripture exhorts us to be kind and tenderhearted forgiving one another – to love our neighbor as ourselves - to sacrificially serve those around us like Christ served the church.  Sin that distorts our life and our love for others surely includes our intense focus on self.


For the length of this sermon, however, I invite you not to think first about others.  As you listen please concentrate first on just one - yourself - your past - your present - your hopes for the future - your struggles – your fears - your state of mind!  You are unique! You have never been at this point in your life before!  For the moment – focus on just one - on you! 


That’s what Jesus did when the Pharisees grumbled, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.”   In their ongoing battle with Jesus, they thought He was wrong in seeking out those whose lives were a mess - hollowed out by bad choices - not respected by others – weak and in need.  They thought Jesus’ business was with decent folk like them.  Our Lord responds with beautiful words about oneone lost sheep, one lost coin, one lost son.  

 

Sheep are pathetically helpless, especially alone, yet they love to make bad choices and wander away.  When they are lost they are not “fighting sheep” but “fearful and frail and soon to fall in death sheep.”  They are Schafskopfmutton heads who do not look for home even when they are fearful and adrift.  When they are found they won’t even walk back with their rescuer.  They need to be carried.  Jesus focus on the one does not mean He loves less the 99.  A very large flock of 100 would have meant village helpers were involved in their care.  They aren’t abandoned in this search – they represent Christ’s church under His abiding care.

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THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 27, 2015

THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 27, 2015
TEXT: LUKE 6:36-42; ROMANS 12:14-21; GENESIS 50:15-21
JUDGMENT AND MERCY ARE YOURS IN CHRIST
Keaton Christiansen


In the name of the Father, and of the + Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.


The words of our gospel lesson today are part of a larger sermon Jesus preaches that we call: “The Sermon on the Plain.”  In this sermon He preaches the second table of the Law, that is: the fourth through tenth commandments, which he summarizes as “Love your neighbor as yourself.” It is in this context, to the disciples who believe in Him, that Jesus gives the command: “37 Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven;”


At face value, this seems to run counter to what we know about the gospel: is Jesus saying that our forgiving is what gets us forgiveness from God? Of course not. The second table of the Law concerns how to treat our fellow human beings, how to love our neighbors as ourselves, and how in turn they might treat us back. It doesn't say “If … Then,” it just says “and.” Give to others, and they're more likely to give back to you. Don't condemn people, and they're much more likely not to condemn you back. This explains what Jesus said not ten verses earlier: “31 As you wish that others would do to you, do so to them.”


But in this fallen world, the passage, “37a Judge not, and you will not be judged” is frequently taken out of its context to mean something entirely different. You've probably heard versions of it here and there, a militant “tolerance” which tolerates no dissent. We live in a world where people try to self-identify as whatever gender, race, or condition, pleases them at the moment. We live in fallen human flesh, that constantly seeks to justify its own perverted urges. Any appeal to God's Law, or even to the basic facts of biology evokes clamors like this: “don't judge me,” “stop judging,” or eventually a smug appeal to the words of Jesus taken out of context: “Judge not, and you will not be judged.”


Dear Christian friends you need not be troubled by this misuse of the Lord's Name and of His Word. You are not to render judgment on others, because you are not the Judge. But, there is a judge, and He has not canceled any Law. Jesus says (Mt 5:17-18): “17 Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18 For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.”

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THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 14, 2015

THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – JUNE 14, 2015
LUKE 14:15-24; EPHESIANS 2:13-22; PROVERBS 9:1-10
COME, FOR EVERYTHING IS NOW READY!
Rev. Kenneth W. Wieting


To the saints who are at Luther Memorial Chapel and University student center, and are faithful in Christ Jesus: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.


Come for everything is now ready!  On His way to Jerusalem Jesus tells of a banquet.  One of those who reclined at table with Him had heard him speak of who to invite if you gave a feast.  Jesus said not to invite your friends or the rich who could repay you but rather the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind.  He ended – For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the Just.  The man who heard these things then said – “Blessed is everyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!” 


Centuries earlier the prophet Isaiah had described a banquet on God’s holy mountain (Isaiah 25:6-9) – of rich food and well-aged wine for “all peoples.”  God would swallow up death forever – the veil that is spread over all nations.  The Jews, however (The Book of Enoch – The Messianic Rule – The Targum) largely rejected Isaiah’s vision of God’s end-time inclusive banquet.  They taught that no Gentiles would be present - nor anyone lame or blind or crippled. (Bailey – Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes – p.311ff.)  Their view of the end-time banquet disagreed with Jesus’ teaching about God’s gracious invitation.  Jesus here rebukes that view and states God’s holy will in the matter. 

 

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Worship with Us!

Divine Service
Sundays @ 9:00am
Mondays @ 7:00pm

Bible Study
& Sunday School
Sundays @ 10:30am
 
Morning Prayer (Matins)
Wednesdays @ 8:30am